W.I.P: Melting Candles – UV / Shading

W.I.P: Melting Candles – UV / Shading

And here we are with the second part of our candles W.I.P post!
A big amount of stuff has changed in the meantime between this and the first post, I dropped out the first candle concept I had in mind and decided to follow another direction, after a bunch of thoughts and tests on scene layout and optimization.

Even with a highly optimized geometry from Meshlab, a proper melted candle didn’t seem to be very friendly for realtime purposes, a single candle with some melting wax had about 1k triangles. For a single asset: OK, but for something that need to be scattered around a good amount of times? hmm, nope.
screenshot011

In the meantime, what I had discovered in my tests is that with subsurface scattering you could just stack several candles together and they would still look coherent, with an almost seamless transition between them, so I had the idea to model only the candles as a group of assets, and a bunch of melted wax set as a complement. This way I’d be able to create a scene with several melted candles together and stuff like that without the huge drawback of a performance, hit as we’ll just have extra geometry where we really need it. Continue reading →

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What To Know When Creating Next Gen Assets

What To Know When Creating Next Gen Assets

Hey guys! I wrote an extensive guide about the next gen asset pipeline for my role at CGMasters, I hope I could clarify some doubts about the general pipeline of game art, and also show my general workflow when working in our current game, Arena:

● References

● When to use triangles

● Getting ready for sculpting

● Thoughts on retopology

● What makes a good UV unwrap

● Getting good normals from a bake

● Next gen texturing

● Resources (LOTS!)

Check the full article here: http://www.cgmasters.net/free-tutorials/what-to-know-when-creating-next-gen-assets

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Making a Tileable Brick Wall (without sculpting)

Making a Tileable Brick Wall (without sculpting)

Sculpting textures is fun, sculpting tileable textures not so much. Unless you use a software like Zbrush with its amazing 2.5D toolset for making tiles, you probably have already had a bad time trying to figure out the best way to tile something in your work. And that’s all about my last week here at the studio, after a loong time without having to touch tilling pipelines (working with unique texture maps can be addictive) I found myself in a situation that I haven’t seen for a long time: creating a full tileable texture. I’ve almost forgotten how did I used to do that back then, so I’m back to square one, I had to do some tests until find something good enough to not make me mad.

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Creating Next-gen Assets from Scanned Data

Creating Next-gen Assets from Scanned Data

Here at the studio we are always looking into new ways to do things, and as I’m working on some graveyard assets for Arena at the moment, I thought it would be a cool idea if I could just go to a cemetery and scan some statues to use as a base to start my models. Starting everything from scratch is cool, but when you need a huge amount of assets with a huge amount of details, you’ll have to start looking for other ways to provide quality content in time.

So here’s the deal, you can start your organic models either sculpting it in a app like Zbrush, or you can take a scanned model as a starting point of your high poly mesh. The first option is nice if you have enough time and good-fast sculpting skills, though in either case, you’ll need a solid organic modeling background, anyway. (unless you use decimation, CHEATER!)

I ended up deciding to use a bit of each, not least because it’s not everyday that we found a 10-feet goat paw demon statue in a graveyard, unless you live in Norway (hail satan).

As a proof of concept I decided to make a ancient asset using a scanned model from Abby Crawford, a archeologist with amazing scans on Sketchfab.

In this article, we will be going through the steps to create a asset using scanned data, and with some useful tips to suceed on it, so without furter ado, here we go:

Continue reading →

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